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2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting Issue:

Dynamic corrections for Sea-Bird Surface Temperature Salinity Sensors (STS) on ARGO profiling floats
Field Validation of ISFET based Ocean pH Sensors
Determination of Conductivity Cell Compressibility for Argo Program CTDs and MicroCATs
Measuring Calibration and Field Variance Scales in Oceanographic Optical Instrumentation Data for Quality Assurance
Nutrient and Estuarine Processes Driven by Hurricane Irma Recorded by the Indian River Lagoon Observatory Network of Environmental Sensors
Tech Tip: Online RMA Status Lookup
Meet Our People
Facebook Spotlight
Upcoming Events

For this month’s newsletter, we thought we would take a little different approach and provide a preview of the science program we have put together for the upcoming Ocean Sciences Meeting to be held in Portland, Oregon from Feb 12-16. The Ocean Sciences Meeting has always been a very important event for the greater oceanographic community, as it provides a valuable opportunity for us to meet, hear about your latest scientific research, and discuss current oceanographic trends and implications for future exploration. In an effort to communicate what we have been working on ourselves, we have provided brief previews of the posters and talks our science team will be presenting at the meeting. We hope to see you in Portland, but if not, please feel free to reach out to us anytime at seabird@seabird.com.

 

Dynamic corrections for Sea-Bird Surface Temperature Salinity Sensors (STS) on ARGO profiling floats

Kim Martini, Ph.D., Senior Oceanographer, David J. Murphy, MS, Director of Research and Development, Raymond W. Schmitt, and Nordeen G. Larson
Monday, February 12, 2018; 4:00-6:00 PM, Oregon Convention Center, Poster Hall

The Surface Temperature Salinity Sensor (STS) is a CTD that extends temperature and salinity measurements through the sea surface on ARGO profiling floats, providing ground truth for satellites and determining meteorological heat and water fluxes. Unlike the primary conductivity sensor on the profiling float, the STS conductivity cell is freely-flushed, which presents additional challenges in data processing to achieve accurate salinities.

We have determined performance characteristics and dynamic corrections for the STS sensor from experiments performed in a stratified tank. We will discuss the functional characteristics of the STS sensor, guiding the analysis and the best practices for applying these corrections in situ.

 

Field Validation of ISFET based Ocean pH Sensors

Charles W. Branham, Ph.D., Senior Chemist and David J. Murphy, MS, Director of Research and Development
Wednesday February 14, 2018; 4:00-6:00 PM, Oregon Convention Center, Poster Hall

Continuous and reliable pH measurements in the ocean remain one of the key challenges facing researchers studying ocean acidification. Commonly used glass bulb pH sensing technology is subject to rapid calibration drift, making it unfit for long-term autonomous deployments. Thus, the need for a robust pH sensor is crucial to understanding our changing seas.

Sea-Bird Scientific pH sensors were developed to meet this need. Based on Honeywell's industrial Durafet pH sensor technology and packaged in a depth tolerant housing, our sensors have demonstrated that they can maintain accuracy for long-term deployments while withstanding harsh conditions. This presentation will focus on calibration of the ISFET pH sensor, evaluate its analytical performance, and validate performance of new pH sensor models using recent field data.

 

Determination of Conductivity Cell Compressibility for Argo Program CTDs and MicroCATs

David J. Murphy, MS, Director of Research and Development and Kim Martini, Ph.D., Senior Oceanographer
Tuesday, February 13, 2018; 4:00-6:00 PM, Oregon Convention Center, Poster Hall

Measuring conductivity in the deep ocean (below 1000 meters) requires a correction for the compressibility of the conductivity cell, which depends on the material that encapsulates the conductivity cell.

Sea-Bird Scientific applies a nominal compressibility correction term measured from conductivity cells manufactured with an epoxy encapsulation material. As part of the development effort for Argo program CTDs and MicroCAT products, Sea-Bird changed the conductivity cell encapsulation material from epoxy to urethane. This change in material necessitates a new compressibility correction.

This work uses data from deployments of Deep Argo CTDs and conductivity calculated from discrete salinity samples to derive the pressure compressibility correction term for a urethane encapsulated conductivity cell. We will verify prior work done to determine the nominal coefficient used for epoxy encapsulated conductivity cells and propose a coefficient for urethane encapsulated cells that will improve the accuracy of conductivity measured in the deep ocean.

 

Measuring Calibration and Field Variance Scales in Oceanographic Optical Instrumentation Data for Quality Assurance

Ian Walsh, Ph.D., Director of Science
Tuesday, February 13, 2018; 4:00-6:00 PM, Oregon Convention Center, Poster Hall

Metrics that test an instrument's current data against previous data are fundamental to real time quality assurance. For oceanographic instrumentation, especially instruments deployed on remote and autonomous platforms, the operator rarely has the luxury of periodically examining the instrument to test its current state relative to the pre and post deployment states.

For remote instruments that report their data in real time or are never intended to be recovered, the instrument's data stream is the only information available to assess data quality. As such, quality metrics must compare field data variance to baseline data from controlled conditions. Often, the instrument's original calibration data is a logical choice for quantifying baseline data.

In this study, we compare signal variances for a suite of instruments that measure optical backscattering and fluorescence. We compare a new instrument design across a variety of controlled environments with instruments that have a much longer pedigree, and we control for data delivery rate and internal averaging to demonstrate the relationship of variance to common use cases, such as when power and data bandwidth limit data rates. We then compare the controlled environment data with field data from a tidally driven environment to demonstrate real-time QA/QC methods.

 

Nutrient and Estuarine Processes Driven by Hurricane Irma Recorded by the Indian River Lagoon Observatory Network of Environmental Sensors

Ian Walsh, Ph.D., Director of Science
Friday, February 16, 2018; 3:36-3:48 PM, Oregon Convention Center, F151

As Hurricane Irma passed over Southeast Florida in September 2017, a suite of biogeochemical sensors tracked its passage and the subsequent effects on the St. Lucie Estuary. Operated by the Indian River Lagoon Observatory Network of Environmental Sensors (IRLON), these in situ sensors logged increased freshwater input from the hurricane's rainfall and the resulting ecological impacts of freshwater flow and elevated nutrient fluxes, reporting these data in near real-time throughout Irma's passing.

Since the St. Lucie Estuary is part of the larger engineered freshwater system in South Florida, the heavy rainfall from Irma and subsequent rainfall events have led to continuing low salinity in these basins through October 2017. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the power of having an in-place sustained network of sensors recording physical and biogeochemical parameters, especially when rare events occur within short periods of time.

 

 

Tech Tip: Online RMA Status Lookup

Now you can see the status of your service job online anytime! Our customers have asked us for a way to see the status of their job without having to call us. In response, we have created an online RMA Lookup Tool that can be accessed on our website. All you need is the RMA job number and key that you receive from us when your service job is created.

Within the tool you can see when the equipment is received, when the repairs are started, when we've sent you the final quote, when the work is complete, when it has moved to shipping and once shipped you can click on the tracking number and get real time shipping updates. No more waiting until our phone lines open, you can get real time status whenever and wherever you are as long as you have internet access.

 

Meet Our People: Dave Murphy, Director of Research and Development


Dave received his B.S. in Oceanography from the University of Washington and M.S. in Electrical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

In his nearly 27 years with Sea-Bird, Dave has had many responsibilities in production, R&D, training, software development, science, and calibration. As Director of Research and Development, his current focus is on product design and development but he still keeps his hand in Sea-Bird’s science customer support efforts.

Dave frequently travels for Sea-Bird, providing training to customers around the world and participating in customer cruises to field test Sea-Bird equipment under development.

Meet Dave at the 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting - Booth 113.

 

Facebook Spotlight

 

Upcoming Events
  • POGO-19 (Partnership for Observation of Global Oceans) Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California, USA. January 23 - 25, 2018
  • 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting: Portland, Oregon, USA. February 11 - 16, 2018
  • OI London 2018: London, UK. March 13 - 15, 2018
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